Since we can’t go to museums right now, insidewink is so happy to bring the art to you!

Talk about the apple not falling far from the tree… Jade is the beautiful daughter of our previous insidewink artist of the month – Cheryl Goettemoeller.

We have known Cheryl for years and have watched her daughter blossom into an amazing artist and woman, much like her mother.

So, here’s Jade:

JADE G. CAMPO

“My paintings usually convey something idealized, with bright colors and as much beauty as I can pour into it.”

What started you on this path?

As a child, I was very practical and worked hard in school to ensure that I would not become an artist like my parents. Now, that may sound harsh, but having seen and heard the reality of what raising a family in L.A. was like for two professional artists, I had my doubts.

I decided early on that I would definitely be taking the safe route, a fast track to practicality and a wildly unsatisfying career. The only problem was that I had a vivid imagination, time on my hands and all the paint that my little heart could desire. I would stare at my mom’s paintings hanging in her art studio, and try to copy them detail by detail. Some might say copyright infringement, others would say it was wholesome. Eventually I had to admit though, I was lucky to be born into an incredibly artistic family that gave me a safe space to value what so few others parents would. I accepted that art was a part of me, just as I saw it to be a part of those that I love.

I think my quest as an artist began when I was about four. I would follow my musician father into his studio with what ever student he was teaching that day. I would lay on the carpeted floor by the piano and draw while they had their lesson. At the end, I would give his student the drawing that I had made. Sometimes, I gave my art to what I thought were adults who obviously knew what they were doing in life and would appreciate a drawing by a cute kid like me. Looking back, I now realize that several of them were teenagers who probably didn’t want nor care about the drawing that I was forcing into their hands. I’m sure many ended up in the recycling bin. But hey, I was getting my name out there from day one.

Who gave you support early on?

As artists, my parents have always given me the most support, as well as the most realistic view of what being an artist is like. They have encouraged it, while also giving the contradictory advice that: “it’s easier to be something that makes more money”. Good advice mom and dad, but at this point it might be irrelevant.

My mom, especially, has been an invaluable brain for me to pick. Most of my questions end up not actually being about the art, but the business decisions that you don’t realize you’re going to have to make when you decide to pursue art. Things like “how much should I ask for a painting?” or “how do I work with galleries?”

What does your work aim to say?

My paintings usually convey something idealized, with bright colors and as much beauty as I can pour into it. I love painting faces, especially eyes, because I think that they’re magnets for our own gaze. It’s the first thing that people are drawn to and I think it has to do with the depth of expression. The eyes hold my own interest when looking at a painting because they inevitably contain mystery. Often times, (in paintings and in life) eyes are slightly guarded and you can only guess what’s underneath them. When I am done with the face I almost always add imagery of nature. I cannot see a human without nature intertwined in their soul. By combining human figures, with elements of nature, I aim to convey a sense of oneness with earth. It is a reminder that there is a place of peace within ourselves that knows it is not separate.

What do you consider success?

To me, success is when you stop fighting against yourself. I think that it happens when you decide to work with what you got and make the most out of it. This simple idea of success takes it out of the unreachable future and plops it right down in the present, where I can access it. When I get out of my own way, everything else falls into place.

What do you love about Los Angeles (even if you don’t live here)?

I like that Los Angeles is so forward thinking. Also, we have a lot of gluten free options at restaurants. 

What was the best piece of advice given to you?

Manage your insecurity so someone else doesn’t have to (or fill in any other neurosis after, “Manage your __________ …”).

What makes you laugh?

My mom when she’s not trying to be funny.

What’s next?

Who knows. Any ideas?

Pie, Cake or Ice Cream?

Granny’s homemade peach cream pie.

Interested in seeing Jade’s  work?

Check out her etsy site: 

JadesArtCenter

More of insidewink’s Artists of Month

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